Monday, April 11, 2011

Ninfamous Reviews Lord of The Flies

What takes four chapters of build up and coffee breaks to stay concentrated and interested, and then blows your  mind?
Yes, Lord of the Flies. I had to read the book last week for a school project. After nearly quitting and watching the movie a couple times, I'm glad I finally waited it out. The story is incredibly. William Golding isn't necessarily Shakesperean, or your typical adjective-savvy imagery writer, but the ideas presented are astounding, and incredibly complex.
The story opens up as a group of boys are stranded on an island after their airplane is bombed down. The protagonist, Ralph, a handsome boy of 12, finds a conch he blows into and it draws all the boys on the island together. The conch becomes a symbol of order and stability, of civilized society. But before long, the different characteristics and innate inclinations of the boys start to divide the crowd and change the scene from playful and happy to vile, egotistical and murderous.
In a nutshell, it's the classic war of good vs evil. In the deeper, darker, layers, however, it really connects one to to the thought that there is an evil inclination inside us all. A side of savagery, a side of ruthlessness. The key idea is - what course will we take? Will we prefer to live in a rule abiding society, where order is established, where dignity and respect are provided? Or will we succumb to savage, basic primitive survival instincts?
Beside this main point, however, there are other several pivotal points to consider, such as, can humans be capable of good with no one to answer to? Is lowering ourselves to the basic instincts the easiest best way to be?
An extraordinary book- that goes beyond the adventure of a couple boys, and delves deep into the deepest darkest corners of the human psyche. A must read for intriguing stimulating thought process.